Billboard top 100 singles 1969. 1969

All US Top 40 Singles for 1969

billboard top 100 singles 1969

The Archies were the apex of this approach: summoned to televisual life by Don Kirshner after The Monkees unceremoniously dumped his songwriting concern. You never hear for sure if he makes it -- but then again, you never technically see Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid go down in a hail of bullets, either. That the song endures as the eternal soundtrack to ejections or foul-outs in pro sports feels appropriately random. The song was a throwaway, composed and performed by studio musicians Gary DeCarlo and Dale Frashuer, meant to occupy space on a B-side -- and later shuttled to an A-side to be released under a made-up band name, so as not to reflect poorly on the songwriters. In the 21st century, the song became a small-screen touchstone, soundtracking moments both and. Ike and Tina Turner performed it -- with horns -- and got their biggest Hot 100 No.

Next

All US Top 40 Singles for 1969

billboard top 100 singles 1969

It just needed the right decade: re-released in 1971, it hit the top 30. The Stonewall Riots, the first letters from the Zodiac killer, the first troop withdrawals from Vietnam and the Nixon doctrine, the Apollo 11 moon landing, the Chappaquiddick incident, the death of Brian Jones and the murder of Sharon Tate, and of course, the original Woodstock Festival -- not only did it all happen that summer, it all occurred in the span of about a month and a half. We're with both Marilyn and Moz: Come on, Bill! The song -- which was written by Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Laura Nyro, sung by the criminally underrated Marilyn McCoo and produced by the talented Bones Howe -- works on both levels; no wonder it shot to No. While this is a rare occurrence, it does happen from time to time. The storytelling is straightforward and brilliant; not much is stated but all is understood, down to the surprisingly necessary yodeling breakdown at the end.

Next

Top 100 Songs

billboard top 100 singles 1969

Poet Weldon Irvine was enlisted to help with the song's lyrics, but he struggled coming up with them -- until he had an epiphany while sitting at a stoplight in Manhattan, en route to pick up a friend from out of town, and ended up scribbling them on a cocktail napkin. And when that spine-tingling, tremolo-laden final chorus hits, it's like reaching a previously unexplored state of blissful consciousness -- and feeling it oh-oh-oh-ver and oh-oh-oh-ver. Or was it when this gaggle of -affiliated Detroit radicals released this grimy single that opened with a profane call to arms? At a time when British acts like Led Zeppelin, John Mayall and The Yardbirds were storming the charts with their interpretations of the genre, King reminded the world that the blues were an American art form. Zappa toyed around with an easygoing, improvisational quality that belies the tedious perfectionist that he was, and yields the perceptible payoff for staying true to himself. Tommy James and the Shondells, No. With the two legendary guitar gods sharing axe duties and a pounding piano line motoring the groove, this song's fleeting 2:44 run time is always too short. A marvel of production two key changes rammed together, Vegas vocals merged with an L.

Next

List of Billboard Hot 100 number

billboard top 100 singles 1969

By the end of the song, the three sing with such desperation that it makes any listener want to sit up straighter, be better. From its simmering opening guitar riff, the song is all swagger and existential turmoil, with subsequent of the classic wailer taking the psychedelically leaning jam band mentality forged years earlier by The Grateful Dead, and giving it the full sound and fury southern gothic treatment. While this is a rare occurrence, it does happen from time to time. It condemns the war as well as anything Country Joe and the Fish did. The Velvet Underground, Did not chart Leave it to Lou Reed to write one of the most soul-shattering ballads of the rock era and make it about an adulterous liaison.

Next

Top 100 Songs

billboard top 100 singles 1969

And so in the Year of Woodstock belonged to cartoon characters. Her rendition of Bob Dylan's Highway 61 Revisited cut was a particular revelation, discovering a sympathy in its lyric and a tenderness in its melody -- via an intimate, stripped-down arrangement that almost sounds like it belongs on the third Velvet Underground album -- that makes the original feel brittle by comparison. Roberta Flack, Did not chart Listeners mostly familiar with Roberta Flack from her smash '70s ballads might be surprised by her 1969 debut single, in which she lays Gene McDaniels' pissed-off protest lyric over barbed horns and upright bass, with the confidence and disgust of a hardened veteran. It was their first No. By the time the song debuted on the Hot 100 in 1969, eventually peaking at No.

Next

The 100 Best Songs of 1969: Staff Picks

billboard top 100 singles 1969

It was the capper the '60s deserved, certainly. And back in those days, that little push could end up moving mountains of misery. Upping the tempo and layering the bass and percussion until the whirling groove kicks up a Tasmanian Devil level of dust, SantamarĂ­a's take on the struggle anthem is even more intoxicating and unnerving than the original, with the two-word shout of the faux-ecstatic title proving the only lyrics necessary. It's necessary motivation, as Starr spends the entirety of his breakout hit convincingly split between his heart and soul refusing to let anything stop him from trudging the titular distance back to his baby, and the rest of his body refusing to do much of anything, at all, ever again. Fake-band vet Ron Dante of and various commercial campaigns sang the lead.

Next

The 100 Best Songs of 1969: Staff Picks

billboard top 100 singles 1969

While this is a rare occurrence, it does happen from time to time. The fact that Michael Cera's character chooses this song for his impromptu sing-for-your-life performance is the. To commemorate this most eventful year in music and culture on the week of Woodstock's 50th anniversary, the Billboard staff is ranking our 100 favorite songs from a year treasured by Bryan Adams and New York Mets fans alike. Of course it would prove incalculably influential on decades of electronic and avant-pop music, from Kraftwerk and Mike Oldfield to Stereolab and Boards of Canada. But the track is more deeply a parable about the double-edged sword of 1969 itself, when the counterculture promises of personal freedom and social revolution devolved into a collective sense of hazy disorientation. The music was no different. If it seems like 2019 is a lot to live through, look back at the summer of 1969.

Next